2009 Volume 1 Issue 11

2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In her book, Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women’s Lives (2000), Cynthia Enloe examines the role militarization plays in women’s lives. Enloe defines militarization as “a step-by-step process by which a... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Over the last few decades there has been an overflow of publications and discussions regarding Pope Pius XII in realtion to the Holocaust and World War II. Originally stemming from Rolf Hochuth’s “The Deputy,” the controversy was... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Even in fairy tales and fantastical legends, the trespassing of the breathing upon the domain of the spirits is rare. It is a disturbing idea; when the dead visit our world, we can at least find comfort in numbers. Yet the hero Odysseus braves the... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Considered by some to be the father of the short story, Anton Chekhov created a paradigmatic form for writing fiction. By mimicking reality he produced a representational art through his stories. The revelations in Chekhov’s fictional characters... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The wonder of opening a book feels very similar to the experience of opening a wardrobe door and finding oneself in another world.  Stories told to children as they prepare for bed act also as vehicles for transportation of imagination, and... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
It is no secret that China today faces serious environmental challenges. The combination of a rapidly growing population and a lack of viable communication between the state and local communities have produced a  difficult situation. Many argue... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In Shakespeare’s play Macbeth, he presents the conflicting character of Lady Macbeth. Upon receiving her husband’s letter about the witches’ prophesies, she attempts to be like a man in order to exude the strength needed to gain... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Procurement in government, as well as in industry, is going through a tremendous change as a result of globalization, technological breakthroughs, and the surge in outsourcing services to outside vendors (Giallourakis, 2008, p. xiii, Preface). ... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In “The Turn of the Screw,” Henry James presents to the reader a story that seems as factual as the recorded ghost sightings that were a major influence for this novel. However, upon further investigation, the reader may begin to wonder... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In less than one year, South Africa will be the proud host of the 2010 World Cup. To many, this privilege is a mere formality of the Cup. Indeed, hosting the World Cup is an honor, but for South Africa it symbolizes a far more complex idea. A history... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The language of religion plays an important part in the novels Brown Girl, Brownstones; The Farming of Bones; and In the Time of the Butterflies. In Brown Girl, Brownstones, the author presents the intricate Silla as a woman who is weary of her... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Why raise the curtain on this 45 day by 45 night saga? In a story whose ending everybody knows already, why choose these actions of these characters to expound upon? The Iliad is not a war tale one might tell in which friends love friends,... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Imagine the vast spectrum of all the cultures in the world. Listen to the music—from the gentle drum beats of Africa, to the melodic didgeridoo of Australia, to the scream of the electric guitar. Taste the curry from India, the coconut milk... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Mortal glory is fleeting. The Old Testament generally does not concern itself with militant triumph or climactic discovery. It much rather prefers to employ “legends, folktales, artfully constructed stories, and the like”[1] to spin... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
By the time 1921 came around, Russia’s economy had been maimed by the effects of War Communism. Socialism had not begun on a good note, and Vladimir Lenin was becoming concerned with the unfortunate state of the economy. His response to the... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
With the explosion of the use of the Internet for nearly all forms of negotiable instrument exchange, the constant transmission of time sensitive and vital corporate communications, and the ubiquitous presence of malicious software writers, verifying... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), a key twentieth-century cultural theorist, has been influential in various fields, including art and literary criticism. He wrote “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” in 1935 to examine... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Derek Walcott’s “A Far Cry from Africa” expresses how Walcott is torn between “Africa and the English tongue [he] love[s]” (30). Several of Walcott’s poems – “The Schooner Flight” and Omeros &... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In the latter part of the third century B.C. India was rapidly changing. The Mauryan dynasty was expanding across the sub-continent of India and the line of kings which had begun with Chandragupta had lost another of its sons, Bindusara. Bindusara... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
I like Kurt Vonnegut because he’s innovative and unique, his literary voice speaking out of a time period I love, when he “was actually helping to breathe life into a new genre—modern, pop fiction,”[1] according to critic... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Many people today are seeking flexibility at work.  Parents, for instance, may want more time for family.  Students hope to fit employment into a busy class schedule.  And some people look for work after retirement.  Whatever... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Socialization is the process by which individuals internalize the mores and norms of the society they live in. It is through this process that the established social order is perpetuated. When individuals fail to accept the beliefs of society as... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Jack Kerouac once wrote, “It’s not the words that count but the rush of what is said." In a graduate class focusing on the origin, art, and development of effective language, choosing a man of letters who, by his own admission, seemingly... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Much debate has recently arisen over China’s and India’s responsibilities as related to climate protection. These two countries have repeatedly pleaded that their emissions be judged on a per-capita basis, since their per-capita emissions... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
That wars are fought by the young for the old is a universally known truth. It is an ancient argument, a tired anti-war theme. Tired not in that it is hackneyed or obsolete, but in that its hollering admonitions have for all of time fallen on ears... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
As the sophistication of cyber criminals continues to increase, their methods and targets have also evolved. Instead of building the large Internet worms that have become so familiar, these criminals are now spending more time concentrating on wealth... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
A character in Toni Morrison's Beloved whose crucial importance to both the plot and thematic intent of the book is Stamp Paid. He is a character with limited space devoted to him, but whose every action is a catalyst for the book as a whole. He... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The Society of Professional Journalists publishes a code of ethics for journalists; among the rules listed is the journalist’s responsibility to seek the truth and report it and his responsibility to minimize harm (www.spj.org). These two... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Multiple undersea internet cables were mysteriously severed and subsequently gained significant attention in the beginning of 2008. The attacks on those cables highlighted the enormous amount of internet traffic that uses the undersea cable system... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
What is a cyclical history? Why does humanity seem doomed to repeat the same mistakes over and over again? Are we doomed to this machine called fate? What is a soul, and how do I express it? Predicting what futures may lay ahead for humanity if... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Hurricanes will always be a way of life for many Texans. Young Texan schoolchildren learn about the Galveston Hurricane of 1900 in their classes; they hear their grandparents discuss Hurricane Carla. Every summer, a flurry of maps, supply lists,... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The earliest form of cryptography was the simple writing of a message, as most people could not read (New World, 2007). In fact, the very word cryptography comes from the Greek words kryptos and graphein, which mean hidden and writing, respectively... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The ability to control one’s sexuality and make informed, responsible decisions about one’s sexual health is a basic human right. The Netherlands, Sweden, Australia, France and Germany protect this right by providing comprehensive sex... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
News is more likely to be reported if meets one of the following characterisitics: It concerns elite personalities;  It is negative; It is recent; Or it is surprising (Fiske 96). The story of the Bush Administration’s “regrouping... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
It is important to note that information about human rights abuses in Chile, as well as the exact details and full connections of its recent political history, are still in the process of being sifted through, made public, gathered, and organized... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
My love for business began as I read Ayn Rand’s acclaimed novel, Atlas Shrugged, in the ninth grade. Packed with adventure, danger, and optimism about our country’s fundamental views on commerce, Atlas Shrugged instilled much of my... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Post-modern art is permeated by Absurdism. The Post-World War II Absurdist movement centered on the idea that life is irrational, illogical, incongruous, and without reason (Esslin xix). The ‘Theater of the Absurd’, named by theater... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Every year, 10-50% of women suffer intimate partner violence (Bargai, Ben-Shakhar, & Shalev, 2007). It is important to understand what conditions affect these battered women and how any resultant conditions interact with each other in order... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
“In London, Hamburg or San Francisco … we rarely see ordinary, middle-aged men and women flirting with homeless teenagers who sit on the pavements begging for spare change, or inviting them out to dinner and then back home to bed.&rdquo... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Aristotle played with the idea of human life as a drama and its role on the Greek stage in his Poetics, defining tragedy—the highest form of drama, of art, and of life—as “a mimesis of an action that is serious, complete, and of... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Within the cultural framework of America, the systemic structure is characterized by White male patriarchy that allows for Black males to have the ability to negotiate the way in which they have been socialized and institutionalized to think, act... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In the autobiography, time and history, at first glance, seem paramount. After all, autobiography is the account of the things that have happened in a person’s life, selected and made ready for public consumption, usually written in the first... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The performativity of ritual, theatre, and spectacle give credence to all three being viewed as a type of social action. Not only do these representations involve enactments, as such, they also involve social interaction among participants. There... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
In Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire, Eve Sedgwick proposes the idea that not only women, but also men, can travel along a social spectrum that ranges from friends to lovers. However, she argues that the male homosocial... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
Sex work has long been criticized and stigmatized in our society. While many members of society view sex work as immoral and degrading to women, I argue that sex work is essentially just work, and that it is not necessarily harmful to women. Under... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 11
The simultaneous allure and repulsion of Mexican machismo belies its ambiguous nature as an identifying characteristic of the nation itself and as a phenomenon that some claim is unique to Mexico and others say is endemic throughout patriarchal... Read Article »

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2009 - Volume 1

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Inquiries Journal is an open-access, multidisciplinary student journal focused on presenting student scholarship in the social sciences, arts, and humanities.