2010 Volume 2 Issue 4

2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Rhetoric is commonly regarded as the art of persuasion. To take it a step further, Gerard A. Hauser states that rhetoric is “An instrumental use of language. One person engages another person in an exchange of symbols to accomplish some goal... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
The meaning behind both Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” and Shakespeare’s sonnets has been debated since their respective publications. Marvell’s poem and specifically Shakespeare’s sonnets 55 and 60 have... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
In the collection of short stories, Interpreter of Maladies, Jhumpa Lahiri uses food and dining as a vehicle to display the deterioration of familial bonds, community, and culture through the transition from Indian to American ways of life. ... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Throughout history, there have been several ways in which people perceive Tibet. Since it has traditionally been isolated from the world, culturally and geographically, the mystery it provokes has shaped most people’s beliefs into viewing... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Baz Luhrmann’s kaleidoscopic film adaptation of Romeo and Juliet, while often leaving much to be desired from the two main actors in the way of delivery, presents a fascinating modern interpretation of the 16th century drama. David Ansen,... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Brazil’s northeast coast has a perfect climate for a booming tourism industry. The beaches are unspoiled, the people are friendly, and the area required only a small amount of infrastructure development to create a haven for tourists. While... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
“I came here to say that I do not recognize anyone’s right to one minute of my life. No matter who makes the claim, how large their number or how great their need” (Rand 684). So states Howard Roark, protagonist of Ayn Rand&rsquo... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
The year 1993 was not a good one for Bill Clinton. An exception, perhaps, being the morning of January 20th when he stood at the west front of the United States Capitol building and took the Oath of Office to become the forty- second President of... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Game Changer—any person, institution, or event whose action significantly alters the current environment and status quo—for better or for worse.  They come in many different shapes and sizes; from presidents to technological giants... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
“You don’t do any singing, you’re too busy swinging”[i]. Thus spoke Malcolm X. He promulgated the new paradigm of anti-nonviolence[ii] he helped popularize during the 1960s. It had been around a decade since Brown v. Board... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Peter Kubelka’s 1966 film “Unsere Afrikareise” or “Our Trip to Africa” is a remarkably unique bit of filmmaking.  Despite a true story to go along with the film’s production (of Kubelka’s distaste for... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Confucianism was one of the dominant political philosophies of Imperial China. Confucianism’s influence declined throughout the 19th century coinciding with the end of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. Some Chinese intellectuals, like Lu Xun, attacked... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
The first line of Plautus’ epitaph reads: “Postquam est mortem aptus Plautus, comoedia luget, scaena est deserta,” or roughly translated, “since Plautus is dead, comedy mourns, deserted is the stage” (Garrod, 531).&... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Throughout history has existed a prevalent theme of men and women being reliant on one another, despite the significant—though changing, and usually artificial—inequalities in areas such as education, career power, and political influence... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
The processes by which the human brain creates, stores, and uses memories are very complex and have been the topics of many research experiments in psychology. In 1972, Craik and Lockhart published a paper on levels of processing that suggested, &... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Since soon after the invention of sound films, directors have been turning popular—and sometimes not so popular—books into motion pictures.  Many a critique, either positive or negative, has been written about the editorializing... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
North and South is a novel defined by the resolution of binary conflicts: heroine Margaret Hale is presented with a number of divisions of sympathy, between industrialists and the working class, between conflicting views of Mr. Thornton, and even... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Angola today is framed by a history of violent conflict that has left the population far behind on all major indicators. Lacking a democratic culture, the country faces two significant challenges: first, the challenge of completing a long-stalled... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
A popular film genre in Britain and the United States during the late 1950s and early 1960s was the rock and roll musical. As Susan Hayward points out, this type of film came about as Hollywood and record companies sought to cash in on the musical... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
The world's largest menorah is not in Jerusalem, Lakewood or even in Crown Heights; it can be found in the town square of  Birobidjan, the capital city of the eponymous Jewish Autonomous Oblast of the Soviet Union. The menorah is 21 meters... Read Article »

Issue Archives

2018 - Volume 10

2017 - Volume 9

2016 - Volume 8

2015 - Volume 7

2014 - Volume 6

2013 - Volume 5

2012 - Volume 4

2011 - Volume 3

2010 - Volume 2

2009 - Volume 1

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Inquiries Journal is an open-access, multidisciplinary student journal focused on presenting student scholarship in the social sciences, arts, and humanities.