Literature

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2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
The first line of Plautus’ epitaph reads: “Postquam est mortem aptus Plautus, comoedia luget, scaena est deserta,” or roughly translated, “since Plautus is dead, comedy mourns, deserted is the stage” (Garrod, 531).&... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
Since soon after the invention of sound films, directors have been turning popular—and sometimes not so popular—books into motion pictures.  Many a critique, either positive or negative, has been written about the editorializing... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 04
North and South is a novel defined by the resolution of binary conflicts: heroine Margaret Hale is presented with a number of divisions of sympathy, between industrialists and the working class, between conflicting views of Mr. Thornton, and even... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
In Leo Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Illyich, the story's protagonist--Ivan--is dead before the story begins. The first chapter concerns itself with some of Ivan’s work associates. With the exception of a posthumous cameo, Tolstoy completely... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
Every person has a birthplace, a starting point that offers a sense of identity for an individual. Through this start, this receding to the roots mentality, one examines their present in terms of their constructed past. Salman Rushdie touches upon... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
The holocaust proved that morality is adaptable in extreme circumstances.  Traditional morality ceased to be so within the barbed wire of the concentration camps. Within the camps, prisoners were not treated like humans and therefore adapted... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
Bohumil Hrabal was born in 1915, and lived through some of the most tumultuous years of Czech history. Hrabal grew up in the time of the First Republic, when literature moved away from nationalism to a more aesthetic view. In this frame, Hrabal... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
In William Shakespeare's The Life of Timon of Athens, the character Apemantus is a Cynic philosopher, who delights in presenting the truth to other characters in the most offensive manner possible. He is a secondary character, but an indispensible... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
Every passing decade, the culture of human beings as a whole has been significantly affected by technology and science. Whether it’s something small, like the invention of automatic doors, or something enormously important, like the invention... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 03
Since its coinage in 1931, the concept of “the American Dream” has lured tens of millions of immigrants from all corners of the planet to the United States with promises of prosperity and happiness far beyond anything attainable in their... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 02
Reading a story by Ursula Le Guin is like watching a poignant movie unfold on screen: captivating and intriguing, a tale that is not simply about inciting reactions but also about finding meaning behind words and images. Le Guin forces the reader... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 02
Bram Stoker’s now legendary novel, Dracula, is not just any piece of cult-spawning fiction, but rather a time capsule containing the popular thoughts, ideas, and beliefs of the Victorian era that paints an elaborate picture of what society... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 02
J.D. Salinger’s “The Laughing Man” is a classic frame story which displays the parallels between a storyteller and his real life.  The narrator of the story, along with his friends, acts as the “readers” of this... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 02
It is perhaps an understatement to say that the character Connie in Joyce Carol Oates’s short story “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” has a lot of issues. Oates has provided the perfect character to undergo a healthy... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 02
In “Amor de lejos: Latino (Im)migration Literatures,” B.V. Olguin writes, “Latino/a (im)migration narratives…often illustrate the traumatic aspects of displacement by focusing in part on how immigration, migration, exile... Read Article »

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