Literature

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2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the author characterizes each woman as passive, disposable and serving a utilitarian function. Female characters like Safie, Elizabeth, Justine, Margaret and Agatha provide nothing more but a channel of action... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
Shakespeare was a man surrounded by controversy.  He, himself, has a biography filled with holes and question marks. Some have even held that the great English Bard could not have been one man.  Although the idea that Shakespeare was... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
In William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, all of the main characters experience and participate in some form of deceit designed to dupe another character.  However, among the societal members of Messina, Don John particularly stands... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
The poems which Sylvia Plath composed in the weeks and days immediately preceding her death contain some of the most disturbing themes present in Modernist poetry. In Ariel, an anthology containing her most fervent, emotional, and troubling poetry... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
In A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare plays with the themes of love, art, imagination, and dreaming to forge an overall meaning for his work.  His play within a play, found in Act V, expands on his themes and portrays the relationship... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
Elizabeth Bishop, known for her reticent poetic style, reveals the secrets of her personal life through carefully wrought metaphors.  In her villanelle, “One Art,” Bishop reveals the purpose of art and the significance of poetic... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
Jean-Baptiste Clamence in Albert Camus's The Fall and the mysterious Ancient Mariner in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner each experience something that radically shifts his worldview and his view of himself. Arrogant and... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
It is tempting to classify literary, cinematic, and historical characters into groups. The trouble, of course, is that such labels can be misleading at best, and severely subjective and variable. When using terms such as hero, villain, anti-hero... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
William Shakespeare’s Richard III is no doubt a fascinating character and an entertaining villain. It is Shakespeare’s command of the English language, and his keen sense of drama and psychological depth, that make his plays so affecting... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
The attacks of September 11th have frequently been characterized as unimaginable, capable of inflicting confusion and emotional trauma beyond the scope of other historical events. On September 12th, 2001, N.R. Kleinfeld of the New York Times asserted... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2 No. 01
Sylvia Plath‘s The Bell Jar is about a young woman named Esther Greenwood entering college in the early 1950’s, a time before the second wave of the women’s movement had been implemented. Esther has dreams of becoming a famous... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 12
The number of ancient sources available to the readers and playwrights of Elizabethan times was truly immeasurable. These sources could be reached both as original texts in Greek and Latin, and in French and English translations. Popular indirect... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 12
William Shakespeare wrote these lines, but his use of the mythological tradition of otherworldly appearances in his plays is anything but insubstantial. Sometimes he crafted them as a permeating presence, other times passing rather quickly, but... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 12
Chaucer’s description of “the Knight” in his “General Prologue” may be seen as a multi-layered narration. First he gives a very precise and historically relevant account of his campaigns. Based on what Chaucer knows... Read Article »
2009, Vol. 1 No. 12
Children’s literature in the context of this research paper (and hopefully too in the eyes of the majority) is the ultimate escape; it is neither box nor leash nor constraint of any sort. It is the one genre of literature that does not hold... Read Article »

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