British Politics  (tagged articles)

The keyword British Politics is tagged in the following 25 articles.

2016, Vol. 8 No. 02
At 7am in the morning after the Referendum on Scottish Independence, a triumphant David Cameron stood on the steps of number 10 Downing Street and announced to the world that the Scottish people had, with 55% of the electorate voting No, comprehensively... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2009/2010 No. 1
Electoral turnout in the United Kingdom varies significantly from one election to the next, be that in a general election or in local elections.1 We originally wanted to discover the reasons as to why the public choose to vote or not. Having read... Read Article »
2010, Vol. 2009/2010 No. 1
An article about Scotland. In an International Politics Journal. This may seem odd, but it could become relevant in the next few years. It is possible that in twenty years that Scottish Politics will be International. Nationalists in Wales and Scotland... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
New Labour’ has committed itself to giving each division of the United Kingdom a parliament or assembly of its own. Already we have a Scottish Parliament and a Welsh Assembly (just because Wales is a principality does it not deserve a parliament... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
Tony Blair has long been committed to the abolition of hereditary peers; the 1997 Labour Party Manifesto promised that this would happen. Labour knew that reform would be difficult and would upset many people of influence, so they took their time... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
In September last year, at its annual conference, a political party took a radical new direction with the appointment of a new leader. British Politics is now feline fine, after the appointment of Mandu the cat as one of the joint leaders of the... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
On Thursday 25th November, over 15,000 students gathered in London for a march and rally against tuition fees and student loans. Since the New Labour government announced they would implement the Dearing report’s recommendation to charge people... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
John Major slipped swiftly from public view after 2 May 1997 as the media and public turned their collective attention to Tony Blair and his New Labour government. Despite the crushing defeat of the Conservatives in 1997, and the continued press... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
The former Defence Secretary and Member of Parliament for Enfield & Southgate, Michael Portillo, has been selected as the Conservative candidate for the safe Tory seat of Kensington & Chelsea. There is no doubt that the Conservative Party... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
At 7.30 am, Glenda Jackson breezed past Euston station. In New Labour fashion she was purposeful but unhurried, radiating a ‘trust me with your future’ manner: truly one of the people, just another commuter. The entrance steps of... Read Article »
2000, Vol. 1999/2000 No. 1
At the time of the 1979 Devolution Referendum, when all the votes were counted and the results were announced, the then Secretary of State for Wales John Morris famously said: “When you see an elephant on your doorstep, you know that it... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 1
On the 14th of October 1998, Mr. Ted Rowlands, Labour MP for Merthyr Tydfil and Rhynmey, gave a brief talk on the Foreign Affairs Select Committee of which he is a member and took questions from students and staff of the International Politics... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 1
In this article I intend to examine the question of whether the Monarchy has a role in Britain’s future. In order to answer this question it is first important to define what exactly is the role of the Monarch in Britain today and then... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 1
With my visit last May to the Palace of Westminster with my Boroughs Youth Council to ‘grill’ or be brainwashed (depending on your degree of cynicism) by John McDonnell MP, The Hillingdon Youth Council saw the ‘Green’... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 1
With the election of Tony Blair to Downing Street in May 1997, there was indeed a great deal of anticipation as to what exactly this ‘New’ Labour government would do to put some life back into Britain. Ever since the jubilation&rsquo... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 1
The role of President was laid out in the Irish Constitution (Bunreacht na hÉireann) of 1937 with the first elections to the position being held in 1938.  The role is defined in articles 12-14 of Bunreacht na hÉireann as being... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 1
The current political climate in the United Kingdom is very much of devolution to regional governments, whether it is in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland or even in England.  The process of devolution in Northern Ireland has emerged from... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 2
It has been nearly two years since the momentous 1997 general election, and we have had a sizeable amount of time to evaluate the new Labour government. Many comparisons have been made between Tony Blair’s government and the government... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 2
The Christmas of 1998 will be seen by political pundits in years to come as the first crisis to assail the ‘New Labour’ government of Tony Blair. I myself, remember sitting at home, having just returned from a short walk with the... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 2
In Issue 53 of Interstate, Peter Hand argued that the ‘Third Way’ was nothing but a well packaged combination of rhetoric and soundbites on the part of a government wholly obsessed by presentation.[1] Given the constraints of space... Read Article »
1999, Vol. 1998/1999 No. 2
It cannot have escaped any layman’s notice that the United Kingdom will very soon cease to mean anything to anybody at all, if it does indeed mean anything to anybody at the moment. Nationalism and devolution have ripped the soft underbelly... Read Article »
1997, Vol. 1996/1997 No. 1
Much has changed in the past years yet we still have the same two dominant parties as we did in 1922. I do not intend to give a historical or purely ideological account but I intend to develop a greater understanding of the more recent changes... Read Article »
1997, Vol. 1996/1997 No. 1
Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Aberystwyth, to open the new extension of the National Library of Wales, has predictably generated considerable furore in the local media, political circles and even the academe. The familiar siren... Read Article »
1997, Vol. 1996/1997 No. 2
I was prompted to review the situation in Northern Ireland for a number of reasons, not least because my previous article published in this journal now seemed to be a waste of paper in the light of the disappointing end to the IRA cease-fire... Read Article »
1997, Vol. 1996/1997 No. 2
It is obvious that the majority of the population finds the breaking of promises, especially those made during an election, unpropitious in anything but the most dire of circumstances. It could be said that if politicians’ election promises... Read Article »

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