Competing Claims in the South China Sea Viewed Through International Admiralty Law

By Constantine J. Petallides
2016, Vol. 8 No. 01 | pg. 3/3 |

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Foreign policymakers, academics, and regional pundits have all acknowledged the importance of the South China Sea. This region, rich in resources and trade, is the subject of intense territorial contest and is perpetually at risk for escalation and confrontation. This research analyzes the potential for conflict in the South China... MORE»
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