An Investigation into the Impact of Children's Literature Through a Review of Dr. Seuss's The Lorax

By A. Rachelle Foss
Earth Common Journal
2014, Vol. 4 No. 1 | pg. 1/2 |

Abstract

This article is a brief overview of The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss, the story of a repentant ex-industrialist who tells a tale of environmental degradation in the name of industrialism, progress, and profit, heedless of warnings from the Lorax—who speaks on behalf of nature. The book imparts lessons on finding a balance between ecology and industrial progress, and taking the first steps to righting the environmental errors of the past. The Lorax, positioned as an important ecological text, has resonated with generations. It is the generations that follow who inherit the earth, making it paramount humankind upholds a sense of responsibility and imparts an understanding of equilibrate approaches to both nature and industry. In addition, this book review examines the importance of engaging, environmental children’s literature as a tool for instilling a lifelong awareness within the formative years, as a strategy for introducing the significance of ecological cognizance.

Introduction to Dr. Seuss

Children’s literature can be overlooked as an important text for ecology education. However, Baratz and Abu Hazeirawhich (2012) note an important point; children’s literature both reflects the culture that distributes it (p. 33) and promotes cultural integration (Abstract), and as such it is an invaluable source for introducing an “ideological infrastructure that will become a way of life” (Abstract). When learning and experiencing ideas in childhood, children then take them into their adult years.

Children’s author, Theodore Giesel understood the influence his stories had on a child’s insight into his or her world. Children’s books “offer a wealth of examples for guiding [their] behaviour and helping them learn social skills and problem-solving strategies for handling challenging situations” (Lacina & Stetson, 2013, p. 34). When Seuss (1971) saw the need to generate awareness about conservationism, his understanding of children’s literature as a tool motivated him to write the well-known children’s ecology book, The Lorax.

Renowned, American children’s author and illustrator, Theodore Seuss Giesel, best known by his pseudonym, Dr. Seuss, published 44 children’s books in his lifetime, including the The Lorax, in 1971, which is still celebrated for bringing environmental awareness to children (Nel, 2010, The Lorax and The Butter Battle Book, para. 4). His stories, although playful and filled with nonsensical words, were intended to engage children and raise their awareness of social and societal issues.

As he wrote in his essay, “Writing for Children: A Mission”—originally published in the Los Angeles Times, November 27, 1960—“children’s reading and children’s thinking are the rock-bottom base upon which this country will rise. Or not rise. In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that books for children have a greater potential for good or evil than any other form of literature on earth” (Nel, 2012, Flood of Treacle, para. 4, New Found Potential, para. 1). As Phil Nel explains in his review of Seuss’s work, the author “also hoped to teach [children] how to think” (Nel, 2010, The Lorax and The Butter Battle Book, para. 1).

A grim illustration of our future and far from “the brightness and laughter” (Miller, 2012, para. 9) associated with the well-known author; the story’s opening scene is reminiscent of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. “At the far end of town/where the Grickle-grass grows/and the wind smells sour and slow when it blows/and no birds ever sing excepting old crows. . . /is the Street of the Lifted Lorax”(Seuss, 1991, p. 285). But the effect was intentional. As Seuss explains, “In The Lorax I was out to attack what I think are evil things and let the chips fall where they might” (Miller, 2012, para. 9).

The Lorax

The Once-ler, the story’s narrator, comes upon a natural paradise and the plentiful resources it holds: “One morning I came to this glorious place/And I first saw the trees!/. . . . Mile after mile in the fresh morning breeze” (Seuss, 1991, p. 296). “All my life I’d been searching for trees such as these” (p. 301). And as is so often the reality, the Once-ler overlooks the natural ecology, only seeing the natural resources as a commodity he “. . . chopped down a Truffula Tree with one chop”(pp.301-302). Finding the Truffula tufts to be a great source of profit, the Once-ler “. . . went right on biggering . . . selling more Thneeds. And I biggered my money, which everyone needs” (p.323).

Seuss is credited for using mnemonics—a device used to assist with learning and retaining information, which he produces using anapaestic tetrameter—“a metrical foot in a line of a poem that contains three syllables wherein the first two syllables are short and unstressed followed by a third syllable that is long and stressed” (Literary Devices, 2014, para. 1). Anapestic tetrameter is a lyrical meter that “plays a very important role in poetry and . . . the foot used in the limerick for comical effects” (Literary Devices, 2014, para. 7). Music (Carlton, 2006, para. 2) and humour (Klein, 2003, p. 125) are established tools for educating young children.

The Once-ler’s assault against the, once pristine, environment continues until, “From outside in the fields came a sickening smack/of an axe on a tree. Then we heard the tree fall. The very last Truffula Tree of them all!”(p.334) “. . . Now all that was left ‘neath the bad-smelling sky/was my big empty factory . . ./ the Lorax . . . /and I”(p.337). Relying heavily on visual metaphor, Seuss deviated from the primary colours he consistently used in his other books. He intended “the contrast between . . . [the] bright colors depicting unspoiled nature and the grays, browns, and dark blues of the polluted landscape . . .[to emphasize] the need to take care of the environment” (Nel, 2010, The Lorax and The Butter Battle Book, para. 3). Seuss could have ended his tale there, as a warning against industrialism. But as Amy Sloane (2010) notes to simply “side with him [the Lorax] is not adequate to the task of overcoming human violence to natural life” (p. 424), and Seuss had a greater vision for his work than simply condemnation. Instead, he places impetus on action and the Once-ler has an epiphany about the importance of the child to whom he is relaying the tale. “‘But now,’ says the Once-ler, /‘Now that you’re here, /the word of the Lorax seems perfectly clear. UNLESS someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. /It’s not’” (Seuss, 1991, p.342).

Once again we see that Seuss has created a metaphorical link between the child character in the story and the child listening to the story being read to him or her. Johansson (2011) points out that “the message seems to be that we have to trust our children, that they are our only hope. How can we even think otherwise? Who else will take responsibility for the future of humanity?” (p. 361). This call for readers to take action appreciates that we simply borrow the earth from our children, and, therefore, it is paramount that we educate the world’s youth on how to care for their planet.

Suggested Reading from Inquiries Journal

From the point of view of childhood, modern Western society shows many parallels to the Romantic Age. While the industrial economy caused rapid changes to the landscape and lives of children, forcing millions of them into labor, the informational economy is similarly having a tremendous impact on children’s lives. Never before... MORE»
Advertisement
The attacks of September 11th have frequently been characterized as unimaginable, capable of inflicting confusion and emotional trauma beyond the scope of other historical events. On September 12th, 2001, N.R. Kleinfeld of the New York Times asserted plainly that the people of New York had “witnessed the inexpressible, the incomprehensible, the unthinkable.”[1] Moreover, 9/11 has frequently been represented as a point of... MORE»
The existence of street children is most often viewed as a significant problem, stripping youth of their humanity and burdening them with the everyday concern of survival. It is easy to analyze this complicated issue objectively, yet the actual experiences of the children are just as easily lost. It is therefore necessary to approach the subject with the inclusion of contextual information regarding the problem. Statistical evidence provides only... MORE»
What we see is partially dependent on what we are shown. As communicators, we have a duty to inform and educate and lead. As environmental communicators we have the privilege of explaining how the various parts of our natural world work, individually, in unison, and in relationship to people. By examining two specific areas of growing... MORE»
Submit to Inquiries Journal, Get a Decision in 10-Days

Inquiries Journal provides undergraduate and graduate students around the world a platform for the wide dissemination of academic work over a range of core disciplines.

Representing the work of students from hundreds of institutions around the globe, Inquiries Journal's large database of academic articles is completely free. Learn more | Blog | Submit

Follow SP

Latest in Literature

2019, Vol. 11 No. 04
This paper explores the conflict between hegemonic and new masculinity in Phil Klay’s Redeployment, illustrating the changing conception of gender roles and masculinity in storytelling about war. This paper juxtaposes traditional conceptions... Read Article »
2019, Vol. 11 No. 02
The corpus of Older Scots literature is hyper-attentive to the themes and issues surrounding nationhood and sovereignty. Authors of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries often espoused and exploited the national pride of the Scottish people, producing... Read Article »
2019, Vol. 11 No. 01
Until the outbreak of civil war, the United States would continually try and fail to subdue the existential threat of slavery, with each attempt exacerbating the sectional tensions between slave and free states. In 1830, Massachusetts Senator Daniel... Read Article »
2019, Vol. 11 No. 01
Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov is a masterpiece of literature that seems to transform into a remarkably personal experience for anyone who approaches the text. The book reads in many ways like a game full of mysteries and innuendos and has in its... Read Article »
2019, Vol. 11 No. 01
The staged plays of the early Jacobean period are valuable textual products for the literary critic, the cultural researcher and the historian alike. These plays are significant containers of knowledge about the mutually reinforcing social and political... Read Article »
2018, Vol. 10 No. 10
Innocent lamb, savage tiger, free-flying eagle – time after time animals interrupt poetry as the ideal, the muse, the hero, or the grotesque operating alongside humanity. In tracking animal imagery throughout contemporary Irish poetry, we... Read Article »
2018, Vol. 10 No. 03
In his poem ‘Punishment’ from the poetry collection North (1975), Seamus Heaney picks up the voice of a witness who is suspended between the possibilities of love, silence, voyeurism, outrage and above all, the understanding of the process... Read Article »

What are you looking for?

FROM OUR BLOG

How to Manage a Group Project (Video)
How to Use Regression Analysis Effectively
The Career Value of the Humanities & Liberal Arts